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AN ACTION PLAN TO FACE THE CHALLENGE OF DEMENTIA: INTERNATIONAL STATEMENT ON DEMENTIA FROM IAP FOR HEALTH

H. Chertkow

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An international committee set up through the IAP for Health met to develop an action plan for dementia. Comprehensive international and national initiatives should move forward with calls for action that include increased public awareness regarding brain health and dementia, support for a broad range of dementia research objectives, and investment in national health care systems to ensure timely competent person-centred care for individuals with dementia. The elements of such action plans should include: 1) Development of national plans including assessment of relevant lifecourse risk and protective factors; 2) Increased investments in national research programs on dementia with approximately 1% of the national annual cost of the disease invested; 3) Allocating funds to support a broad range of biomedical, clinical, and health service and systems research; 4) Institution of risk reduction strategies; 5) Building the required trained workforce (health care workers, teachers, and others) to deal with the dementia crisis; 6) Ensuring that it is possible to live well with dementia; and 7) Ensuring that all have access to prevention programs, care, and supportive living environments.

CITATION:
H. Chertkow (2018): An Action Plan to Face the Challenge of Dementia: INTERNATIONAL STATEMENT ON DEMENTIA from IAP for Health. The Journal of Prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease (JPAD). http://dx.doi.org/10.14283/jpad.2018.27

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WHO GUIDELINES ON COMMUNITY-LEVEL INTERVENTIONS TO MANAGE DECLINES IN INTRINSIC CAPACITY: THE ROAD TO PREVENTION COGNITIVE DECLINE IN OLDER AGE?

B. Vellas, R. Scrase, G.A. Rosenberg, S. Andrieu, I. Araujo de Carvalho, L.T. Middleton

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CITATION:
B. Vellas ; R. Scrase ; G.A. Rosenberg ; S. Andrieu ; I. Araujo de Carvalho ; L.T. Middleton (2018): WHO Guidelines on Community-Level Interventions to Manage Declines in Intrinsic Capacity: The Road to Prevention Cognitive Decline in Older Age?. The Journal of Prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease (JPAD). http://dx.doi.org/10.14283/jpad.2018.26

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TURNING POINT TOWARDS BLOOD BIOMARKER-GUIDED TARGETED THERAPY FOR PRECISION MEDICINE IN ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE

H. Hampel, A. Vergallo, U. Bonuccelli, S. Lista, for the Alzheimer Precision Medicine Initiative (APMI)

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CITATION:
H. Hampel ; A. Vergallo ; U. Bonuccelli ; S. Lista ; for the Alzheimer Precision Medicine Initiative (APMI) ; (2018): Turning Point towards Blood Biomarker-Guided Targeted Therapy for Precision Medicine in Alzheimer’s Disease. The Journal of Prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease (JPAD). http://dx.doi.org/10.14283/jpad.2018.25

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PLASMA BIOMARKER FOR ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE: ARE WE READY NOW FOR CLINICAL PRACTICE AND DRUG TRIALS?

A. Nakamura

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CITATION:
A. Nakamura (2018): Plasma Biomarker for Alzheimer’s Disease: Are We Ready Now for Clinical Practice and Drug Trials?. The Journal of Prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease (JPAD). http://dx.doi.org/10.14283/jpad.2018.24

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WHAT HAVE WE LEARNED FROM EXPEDITION III AND EPOCH TRIALS? PERSPECTIVE OF THE CTAD TASK FORCE

P.S. Aisen, E. Siemers, D. Michelson, S. Salloway, C. Sampaio, M.C. Carrillo, R. Sperling, R. Doody, P. Scheltens, R. Bateman, M. Weiner, B. Vellas, and the EU/US/CTAD Task Force members

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Although the results were disappointing from two recent clinical trials of amyloid-targeting drugs in mild-to-moderate AD, the trials provided information that will be important for future studies, according to the EU-US CTAD Task Force, which met in November 2017 to discuss the EXPEDITION3 and EPOCH trials. These trials tested two of the predominant drug development strategies for AD: amyloid immunotherapy and BACE inhibition in populations largely composed of mild AD dementia patients. The results of these trials support the emerging consensus that effective amyloid-targeted treatment will require intervention in early, even pre-symptomatic stages of the disease. Further, the Task Force suggested that a refinement of the amyloid hypothesis may be needed and that other hypotheses should be more fully explored. In addition, they called for improved biomarkers and other outcome assessments to detect the earliest changes in the development of AD.

CITATION:
P.S. Aisen ; E. Siemers ; D. Michelson ; S. Salloway ; C. Sampaio ; M.C. Carrillo ; R. Sperling ; R. Doody ; P. Scheltens ; R. Bateman ; M. Weiner ; B. Vellas ; and the EU/US/CTAD Task Force members* (2018): What Have We Learned from Expedition III and EPOCH Trials? Perspective of the CTAD Task Force. The Journal of Prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease (JPAD). http://dx.doi.org/10.14283/jpad.2018.23

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ANALYSIS OF THE RELATIONSHIP OF COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT AND FUNCTIONAL IMPAIRMENT IN MILD ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE IN EXPEDITION 3

H. Liu-Seifert, E. Siemers, K. Sundell, M. Mynderse, J. Cummings, R. Mohs, P. Aisen

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BACKGROUND: Clinical progression of Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by impairment in cognition and function. OBJECTIVE: To assess the relationship between cognitive and functional impairment in mild Alzheimer’s disease. DESIGN: Spearman’s rank correlations between cognitive and functional measures were calculated. Autoregressive cross-lagged panel analyses were used to determine the temporal relationship between cognitive and functional decline. SETTING: Post-hoc analysis of clinical trial data. PARTICIPANTS: Placebo-treated patients with mild Alzheimer’s disease from the Phase 3 solanezumab study EXPEDITION 3. INTERVENTION: Placebo MEASUREMENTS: Cognitive and functional measures were assessed at baseline and at six post-baseline time points through Week 80. RESULTS: Correlation between cognitive and functional measures was 0.41 at baseline and 0.65 at Week 80. Autoregressive cross-lagged panel analysis demonstrated that cognitive impairment preceded and predicted subsequent functional decline, but functional scores did not predict cognitive outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: This study supports the hypothesis that functional impairment predictably follows cognitive decline in mild Alzheimer’s disease dementia.

CITATION:
H. Liu-Seifert ; E. Siemers ; K. Sundell ; M. Mynderse ; J. Cummings ; R. Mohs ; P. Aisen (2018): Analysis of the Relationship of Cognitive Impairment and Functional Impairment in Mild Alzheimer’s Disease in EXPEDITION 3. The Journal of Prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease (JPAD). http://dx.doi.org/10.14283/jpad.2018.22

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EFFECTS ON COGNITION OF BERRY, POMEGRANATE, GRAPE AND BIOPHENOLS: A GENERAL REVIEW

L. Al Damen, A. Stockton, E.A.S. Al-Dujaili

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Decline in cognitive function can be observed in normal aging, MCI, neurodegenerative disorders, cerebral hypoperfusion and post-surgery. Cognitive impairment presents with limited therapeutic options. Berries, pomegranates and grapes are polyphenol-rich fruits that have both antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. This review aims to explore the effects of these fruits and their biophenols on cognitive function in healthy subjects and their protective effects on cognitive deficits in normal aging, mild cognitive impairment, Alzheimer’s disease (AD), cerebral hypoperfusion using both animal models and human studies. MEDLINE® and Proquest Central data bases were searched to retrieve articles used in this general review according to specific inclusion criteria. Independently, two researchers have summarized the study characteristics and assessed quality of methodology. Meta-analysis was not possible due to the limited number of studies and marked heterogeneity, and thus results were presented as a narrative review. Biophenol-rich fruits have been shown to exert cognitive functions boosting and enhanced memory in children and healthy adults. In patients with age related cognitive decline, MCI and AD, Biophenols-rich fruits showed a marked enhancement of memory and verbal fluency with reduced dementia risk, and in artery graft and valve surgery, pomegranate protected against memory impairment. Animal studies have shown that biophenols intake enhanced cognition in AD models presumably due to a reduction of Amyloidβ plaque deposition, inflammatory cytokines, microgliosis (glial cells hypertrophy), and brain DNA protection. In conclusion, large scale studies are urgently needed to fully evaluate the preventive and/or adjunctive therapy of biophenol-rich fruits in cognitive decline, deficit and Alzheimer disease.

CITATION:
L. Al Damen ; A. Stockton ; E.A.S. Al-Dujaili ; (2018): Effects on Cognition of Berry, Pomegranate, Grape and Biophenols: A General Review. The Journal of Prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease (JPAD). http://dx.doi.org/10.14283/jpad.2018.21

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DETECTION OF RATER ERRORS ON COGNITIVE INSTRUMENTS IN A CLINICAL TRIAL SETTING

D.J. Connor, C.W. Jenkins, D. Carpenter, R. Crean, P. Perera

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OBJECTIVES: This study examines errors committed by raters in a clinical trial of a memory enhancement compound. BACKGROUND: Findings of clinical trials are directly dependent on the quality of the data obtained but there is little literature on rates or nature of rater errors on cognitive instruments in a multi-site setting. DESIGN: Double-blind placebo-controlled study. SETTING: 21 clinical sites in North America. PARTICIPANTS: Two hundred seventy-five participants. MEASUREMENTS: MMSE, WMS-R Logical Memory I & II, WMS-R Verbal Paired Associates I, WASi Vocabulary, WASi Matrix Reasoning, GDS and MAC-Q. RESULTS: The WMS-R Logical Memory I & II and WASi Vocabulary tests were found to have the greatest number of scoring errors. Few substantive errors were detected on source document review of the MMSE, GDS, MAC-Q and WMS-R Verbal Paired Associates I. Some additional administration and scoring issues were identified during feedback sessions with the raters. CONCLUSIONS: Cognitive measures used in clinical trials are prone to errors which can be detected with proper monitoring. Some instruments are particularly prone to inter-rater variably and should therefore be targets for focused training and ongoing monitoring. Areas in need of further investigation to help inform and optimize quality of clinical trial data are discussed.

CITATION:
D.J. Connor ; C.W. Jenkins ; D. Carpenter ; R. Crean ; P. Perera (2018): Detection of Rater Errors on Cognitive Instruments in a Clinical Trial Setting. The Journal of Prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease (JPAD). http://dx.doi.org/10.14283/jpad.2018.20

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INCREASED FUNCTIONAL CONNECTIVITY AFTER LISTENING TO FAVORED MUSIC IN ADULTS WITH ALZHEIMER DEMENTIA

J.B. King, K.G. Jones, E. Goldberg, M. Rollins, K. MacNamee, C. Moffit, S.R. Naidu, M.A. Ferguson, E. Garcia-Leavitt, J. Amaro, K.R. Breitenbach, J.M. Watson, R.K. Gurge, J.S. Anderson, N.L. Foster

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Background: Personalized music programs have been proposed as an adjunct therapy for patients with Alzheimer disease related dementia, and multicenter trials have now demonstrated improvements in agitation, anxiety, and behavioral symptoms. Underlying neurophysiological mechanisms for these effects remain unclear. Methods: We examined 17 individuals with a clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer disease related dementia using functional MRI following a training period in a personalized music listening program. Results: We find that participants listening to preferred music show specific activation of the supplementary motor area, a region that has been associated with memory for familiar music that is typically spared in early Alzheimer disease. We also find widespread increases in functional connectivity in corticocortical and corticocerebellar networks following presentation of preferred musical stimuli, suggesting a transient effect on brain function. Conclusions: Findings support a mechanism whereby attentional network activation in the brain’s salience network may lead to improvements in brain network synchronization.

CITATION:
J.B. King ; K.G. Jones ; E. Goldberg ; M. Rollins ; K. MacNamee ; C. Moffit ; S.R. Naidu ; M.A. Ferguson ; E. Garcia-Leavitt ; J. Amaro ; K.R. Breitenbach ; J.M. Watson ; R.K. Gurgel ; J.S. Anderson1 ; N.L. Foster (2018): Increased Functional Connectivity After Listening to Favored Music in Adults With Alzheimer Dementia. The Journal of Prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease (JPAD). http://dx.doi.org/10.14283/jpad.2018.19

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EFFECTS OF A SIX-MONTH MULTI-INGREDIENT NUTRITION SUPPLEMENT INTERVENTION OF OMEGA-3 POLYUNSATURATED FATTY ACIDS, VITAMIN D, RESVERATROL, AND WHEY PROTEIN ON COGNITIVE FUNCTION IN OLDER ADULTS: A RANDOMISED, DOUBLE-BLIND, CONTROLLED TRIAL

C. Moran, A. Scotto di Palumbo, J. Bramham, A. Moran, B. Rooney, G. De Vito, B. Egan

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Objectives: To investigate the impact of a six-month multi-ingredient nutrition supplement intervention (Smartfish®), containing omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), vitamin D, resveratrol, and whey protein, on cognitive function in Irish older adults. Design: Double-blind, randomised controlled trial (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02001831). A quantitative, mixed-model design was employed in which the dependent variable (cognitive function) was analysed with a between-subjects factor of group (placebo, intervention) and within-subjects factor of testing occasion (baseline, three-months, six-months). Setting: Community-based intervention including assessments conducted at University College Dublin, Ireland. Participants: Thirty-seven community-dwelling older adults (68-83 years; mean (x̄)= 75.14 years; standard deviation (SD)= 3.64; 18 males) with normal cognitive function (>24 on the Mini Mental State Examination) were assigned to the placebo (n= 17) or intervention (n= 20) via a block randomisation procedure. Intervention: Daily consumption for six-months of a 200mL liquid juice intervention comprising 3000mg omega-3 PUFAs [1500mg docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and 1500mg eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)], 10μg vitamin D3, 150mg resveratrol and 8g whey protein isolate. The placebo contained 200mL juice only. Measurements: A standardised cognitive assessment battery was conducted at baseline and follow-ups. Individual test scores were z-transformed to generate composite scores grouped into cognitive domains: executive function, memory, attention and sensorimotor speed. Motor imagery accuracy and subjective awareness of cognitive failures variables were computed from raw scores. Results: A hierarchical statistical approach was used to analyse the data; first, by examining overall cognitive function, then by domain, and then by individual test scores. Using mixed between-within subjects, analyses of variance (ANOVAs), no significant differences in overall cognitive function or composite cognitive domains were observed between groups over time. The only significant interaction was for Stroop Color-Word Time (p< 0.05). The intervention group demonstrated reduced task completion time at three- and six-month follow-ups, indicating enhanced performance. Conclusion: The present nutrition intervention encompassed a multi-ingredient approach targeted towards improving cognitive function, but overall had only a limited beneficial impact in the older adult sample investigated. Future investigations should seek to establish any potential clinical applications of such targeted interventions with longer durations of supplementation, or in populations with defined cognitive deficits.

CITATION:
C. Moran ; A. Scotto di Palumbo ; J. Bramham ; A. Moran ; B. Rooney ; G. De Vito ; B. Egan (2018): Effects of a Six-Month Multi-Ingredient Nutrition Supplement Intervention of Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids, vitamin D, Resveratrol, and Whey Protein on Cognitive Function in Older Adults: A Randomised, Double-Blind, Controlled Trial. The Journal of Prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease (JPAD). http://dx.doi.org/10.14283/jpad.2018.11

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FATTY ACIDS AND ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE: EVIDENCE ON COGNITION AND CORTICAL ?-AMYLOID FROM SECONDARY ANALYSES OF THE MULTIDOMAIN ALZHEIMER PREVENTIVE TRIAL

C. Hooper, B. Vellas

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CITATION:
C. Hooper ; B. Vellas (2018): Fatty acids and Alzheimer’s disease: evidence on cognition and cortical β-amyloid from secondary analyses of the Multidomain Alzheimer Preventive Trial. The Journal of Prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease (JPAD). http://dx.doi.org/10.14283/jpad.2018.7

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CORRELATION OF CSF- AND MRI-BIOMARKERS AND PROGRESSION OF COGNITIVE DECLINE IN AN OPEN LABEL MCI TRIAL

L.K. Joachim, L. Frölich, E. Rüther, J. Wiltfang, W. Maier, J. Kornhuber, C. Bauer, I. Heuser, O. Peters

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Background: In several randomized controlled trials (RCT) acetylcholinesterase-inhibitors (AChE-I) were tested in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) but were ineffective in delaying disease progression as determined by neuropsychological testing only. Here we present data from an open label observational extension of a multicenter RCT in order to assess if biomarkers are providing useful additional information about a drug’s efficacy. We followed 83 amnestic MCI patients and performed correlational analyses of Aβ 1-42 and total-Tau in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), hippocampal and amygdala volume at baseline, the total duration of blinded and open label AChE-I treatment and the outcome 24 months after inclusion into the RCT. Twelve out of 83 amnestic MCI (14%) had progressed to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Overall, worsening and disease progression as measured by the Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale - cognitive subscale (ADAS-cog), Alzheimer’s Disease Cooperative Study - Activities of Daily Living (ADCS-ADL) and Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) did not correlate with the duration of AChE-I treatment. However, a specific multidimensional biomarker profile at baseline indicated more reliably than cognitive testing alone progression to AD. We conclude that pharmacological RCTs testing symptomatic treatment effects in MCI should include biomarker assessment.

CITATION:
L.K. Joachim ; L. Frölich ; E. Rüther ; J. Wiltfang ; W. Maier ; J. Kornhuber ; C. Bauer ; I. Heuser ; O. Peters (2018): Correlation of CSF- and MRI-Biomarkers and Progression of Cognitive Decline in an Open Label MCI Trial. The Journal of Prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease (JPAD). http://dx.doi.org/10.14283/jpad.2018.5

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AURAPTENE IN THE PEELS OF CITRUS KAWACHIENSIS (KAWACHIBANKAN) CONTRIBUTES TO THE PRESERVATION OF COGNITIVE FUNCTION: A RANDOMIZED, PLACEBO-CONTROLLED, DOUBLE-BLIND STUDY IN HEALTHY VOLUNTEERS

M. Igase, Y. Okada, M. Ochi, K. Igase, H. Ochi, S. Okuyama, Y. Furukawa, Y. Ohyagi

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OBJECTIVES: Dementia, which is characterized by a progressive decline in cognitive function, is a major concern in aging societies. Although a number of treatments have been approved, an effective therapy to prevent the disorder is lacking. A supplement that improves cognitive function would benefit patients. The aim of this study was to assess whether auraptene, a citrus coumarin, has a protective effect on cognitive decline. DESIGN: A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study SETTING: Outpatient medical check-up program for cognitive disorders PARTICIPANTS: 84 adult volunteers (they are cognitively normal) met inclusion and exclusion criteria to participate. INTERVENTION: 42 participants received auraptene enriched (containing 6.0 mg/day of auraptene) test juice, and another participants received placebo juice. MEASUREMENTS: 1) Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) Screen using the 10-word immediate recall test. 2) The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). Cognitive assessment ware carried out baseline and at 24 weeks. RESULTS: Auraptene enriched test juice did not improve cognitive function after 24 weeks compared with baseline data. However, there was a significant difference in the percentage change in cognitive function between the test and placebo orange juice groups (6.3 ± 18.9 vs. −2.4 ± 14.8, P < 0.05). Multiple regression analysis demonstrated a significant independent relationship between the percentage change in the 10-word immediate recall test score and test juice consumption including baseline 10-word immediate recall test score in all subjects. CONCLUSION: This is the first study to assess the effectiveness of auraptene in the prevention of cognitive decline. Our results suggest that auraptene is a safe supplement for the prevention of cognitive decline.

CITATION:
M. Igase ; Y. Okada ; M. Ochi ; K. Igase ; H. Ochi ; S. Okuyama ; Y. Furukawa ; Y. Ohyagi (2017): Auraptene in the Peels of Citrus Kawachiensis (Kawachibankan) Contributes to the Preservation of Cognitive Function: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind Study in Healthy Volunteers. The Journal of Prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease (JPAD). http://dx.doi.org/10.14283/jpad.2017.47

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JPAD Volume 5, N°02 - 2018

 

Editorials

PREVENTION OF ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE IN CHINESE POPULATIONS: STATUS, CHALLENGES AND DIRECTIONS

L. Feng, J. Li, J.-T. Yu, C. Zhang, B. Yang, B. Vellas, C. Li

J Prev Alz Dis 2018;5(2):90-94

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CITATION:
L. Feng ; J. Li ; J.-T. Yu ; C. Zhang ; B. Yang ; B. Vellas ; C. Li (2018): Prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease in Chinese Populations: Status, Challenges and Directions. The Journal of Prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease (JPAD). http://dx.doi.org/10.14283/jpad.2018.14

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DIABETES MELLITUS AND COGNITIVE DECLINE – PREVENTION SHOULD NOT BE DELAYED!

A.J. Sinclair, B. Vellas

J Prev Alz Dis 2018;5(2):95-97

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CITATION:
A.J. Sinclair ; B. Vellas (2018): Diabetes Mellitus and Cognitive Decline – Prevention Should Not Be Delayed!. The Journal of Prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease (JPAD). http://dx.doi.org/10.14283/jpad.2018.9

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CTAD Task Force

IDENTIFYING BETTER OUTCOME MEASURES TO IMPROVE TREATMENT OF AGITATION IN DEMENTIA: A REPORT FROM THE EU/US/CTAD TASK FORCE

M. Sano, M. Soto, M. Carrillo, J. Cummings, S. Hendrix, J. Mintzer, A. Porsteinsson, P. Rosenberg, L. Schneider, J. Touchon, P. Aisen, B. Vellas, C. Lyketsos, and the EU/US/CTAD Task Force members

J Prev Alz Dis 2018;5(2):98-102

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For the second time in the past 3 years, the EU-US CTAD Task Force addressed challenges related to designing clinical trials for agitation in dementia, which is one of the most disruptive aspects of the condition for both patients and caregivers. Six recommendations emerged from the Task Force meeting: 1 – Operationalizing agitation criteria established by the IPA; 2 – Combining clinician- and caregiver-derived outcomes as primary outcome measures; 3 – Using global ratings to define clinically meaningful effects and power studies; 4 – Improving the accuracy of caregiver reports by better training and education of caregivers; 5 – Employing emerging technologies to collect near real-time behavioral data; and 6 – Utilizing innovative trial designs and increasing the use of biomarkers to maximize the productivity of clinical trials for neuropsychiatric symptoms.

CITATION:
M. Sano ; M. Soto ; M. Carrillo ; J. Cummings ; S. Hendrix ; J. Mintzer ; A. Porsteinsson ; P. Rosenberg ; L. Schneider ; J. Touchon ; P. Aisen ; B. Vellas ; C. Lyketsos ; and the EU/US/CTAD Task Force members (2018): Identifying Better Outcome Measures to Improve Treatment of Agitation in Dementia: A Report from the EU/US/CTAD Task Force. The Journal of Prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease (JPAD). http://dx.doi.org/10.14283/jpad.2018.15

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Brief Report

BIOMARKER AND CLINICAL TRIAL DESIGN SUPPORT FOR DISEASE-MODIFYING THERAPIES: REPORT OF A SURVEY OF THE EU/US: ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE TASK FORCE

J. Cummings, N. Fox, B. Vellas, P. Aisen, G. Shan, for the EU/US Alzheimer’ Disease Task Force

J Prev Alz Dis 2018;5(2):103-109

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BACKGROUND: Disease-modifying therapies are urgently needed for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The European Union/United States (EU/US) Task Force represents a broad range of stakeholders including biopharma industry personnel, academicians, and regulatory authorities. OBJECTIVES: The EU/US Task Force represents a community of knowledgeable individuals who can inform views of evidence supporting disease modification and the development of disease-modifying therapies (DMTs). We queried their attitudes toward clinical trial design and biomarkers in support of DMTs. DESIGN/SETTING/PARTICIANTS: A survey of members of the EU/US Alzheimer’s Disease Task Force was conducted. Ninety-three members (87%) responded. The details were analyzed to understand what clinical trial design and biomarker data support disease modification. MEASUREMENTS/RESULTS/CONCLUSIONS: Task Force members favored the parallel group design compared to delayed start or staggered withdrawal clinical trial designs to support disease modification. Amyloid biomarkers were regarded as providing mild support for disease modification while tau biomarkers were regarded as providing moderate support. Combinations of biomarkers, particularly combinations of tau and neurodegeneration, were regarded as providing moderate to marked support for disease modification and combinations of all three classes of biomarkers were regarded by a majority as providing marked support for disease modification. Task Force members considered that evidence derived from clinical trials and biomarkers supports clinical meaningfulness of an intervention, and when combined with a single clinical trial outcome, nearly all regarded the clinical trial design or biomarker evidence as supportive of disease modification. A minority considered biomarker evidence by itself as indicative of disease modification in prevention trials. Levels of evidence (A,B,C) were constructed based on these observations. CONCLUSION: The survey indicates the view of knowledgeable stakeholders regarding evidence derived from clinical trial design and biomarkers in support of disease modification. Results of this survey can assist in designing clinical trials of DMTs.

CITATION:
J. Cummings ; N. Fox ; B. Vellas ; P. Aisen ; G. Shan ; for the EU/US Alzheimer’ Disease Task Force (2018): Biomarker and Clinical Trial Design Support for Disease-Modifying Therapies: Report of a Survey of the EU/US: Alzheimer’s Disease Task Force. The Journal of Prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease (JPAD). http://dx.doi.org/10.14283/jpad.2018.13

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MINIMIZING THE SAMPLE SIZES OF CLINICAL TRIALS ON PRECLINICAL AND EARLY SYMPTOMATIC STAGE OF ALZHEIMER DISEASE

J. Luo, H. Weng, J.C. Morris, C. Xiong

J Prev Alz Dis 2018;5(2):110-119

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Background: Clinical trials of investigational drugs for Alzheimer disease (AD) increasingly focus on the prodromal (symptomatic) stage of the illness and now its preclinical (asymptomatic) stage. Sensitive and specific cognitive and functional endpoints are needed to track subtle cognitive and functional changes in the early and preclinical stages to minimize sample sizes in these trials. Objectives: To identify informative items in a standard clinical assessment protocol and a psychometric battery that are predictive of onset of dementia symptom. Design: Longitudinal retrospective study. Setting: Washington University (WU) Knight Alzheimer Disease Research Center (ADRC). Participants: A total of 735 individuals at least 65 years old and cognitively normal at baseline from a longitudinal clinical cohort at the WU Knight ADRC. Measurements: The annual clinical assessment included a wide spectrum of functional and cognitive domains; a comprehensive psychometric battery was completed about 2 weeks after the clinical evaluation. Psychometricians are blinded to the results of the clinical evaluation and to the prior performance of the participants on the psychometric tests. Results: The mean age at baseline of the 735 participants was 74.30 and 62.31% were female. 240 individuals developed prodromal dementia symptoms (consistent with mild cognitive impairment due to AD and with very mild AD dementia) during longitudinal follow-up (mean follow-up=6.79 years). Among a total of 562 items in the clinical and cognitive assessments under analysis, 292 (52%) were identified as informative because their longitudinal changes were predictive of symptomatic onset. When these items were used to form the functional and cognitive composites, the longitudinal rates of changes were free of a learning effect and captured subtle longitudinal progression prior to symptomatic onset. The rates of change were much greater right after the symptomatic onset than those from the functional and cognitive composites formed using non-informative items. Although the sample sizes for prevention trials (prior to symptomatic onset) using the informative items still yield large numbers, the sample sizes for early treatment trial (after symptomatic onset) was much smaller than those derived from all the items or from the non-informative items alone. Conclusions: The antecedent longitudinal changes in nearly half of the items in a clinical assessment protocol and a comprehensive cognitive battery did not show statistically significant ability to predict the dementia symptom onset, and hence may be non-informative to track the preclinical functional and cognitive progression of AD. The remaining items, on the other hand, captured some of the preclinical changes prior to the symptom onset, but performed much better right after the symptom onset. Currently ongoing prevention trials on preclinical AD of elderly individuals may need to re-assess the sample sizes and statistical power.

CITATION:
J. Luo ; H. Weng ; J.C. Morris ; C. Xiong (2018): Minimizing the Sample Sizes of Clinical Trials on Preclinical and Early Symptomatic Stage of Alzheimer Disease. The Journal of Prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease (JPAD). http://dx.doi.org/10.14283/jpad.2018.16

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A LITERATURE REVIEW OF METHODOLOGIES USED IN RANDOMIZED CLINICAL TRIALS OF AGITATION IN ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE

S. Dubé, J.T. Megerian, R. Malamut

J Prev Alz Dis 2018;5(2):120-133

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Agitation is a common and burdensome symptom associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). This is a narrative literature review of the designs and methods used in randomized clinical trials of agitation in patients with AD; sources range from published, to completed but not published, to ongoing studies in the past 10 years. Selection for review included blinded, randomized trials conducted to assess the effect of a pharmacological intervention for which agitation in patients with AD was among the prespecified end points. Key criteria for exclusion included open-label studies, trials of dementia not specific to AD, or mixed populations of AD and unspecified dementia. A search of PubMed and clinicaltrials.gov databases identified 36 trials for which agitation was among the prespecified end points: 18 were published trials and 18 were completed but not published or ongoing. There was significant heterogeneity among AD studies in terms of diagnostic criteria, assessment of severity of disease and agitation, sample size and powering assumptions, treatment duration, patient age and cognitive status, and outcomes measurements. Few studies used a mitigation strategy for placebo response. Accumulating evidence suggests that it is important to consider the following in trial design: thresholds for baseline severity of agitation and AD; use of prespecified accepted criteria to define agitation; and use of standardized, validated tools to measure treatment effects during a trial. Adoption of these design strategies might help improve signal detection and bring us closer to identifying the most appropriate, effective, and safe treatments for agitation in patients with AD.

CITATION:
S. Dubé ; J.T. Megerian ; R. Malamut (2018): A Literature Review of Methodologies Used in Randomized Clinical Trials of Agitation in Alzheimer’s Disease. The Journal of Prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease (JPAD). http://dx.doi.org/10.14283/jpad.2018.17

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Original Research

THE INTEGRATED ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE RATING SCALE (IADRS) FINDINGS FROM THE EXPEDITION3 TRIAL

A.M. Wessels, S.W. Andersen, S.A. Dowsett, E.R. Siemers

J Prev Alz Dis 2018;5(2):134-136

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The Integrated Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) Rating Scale (iADRS) is a composite tool that combines scores from the AD Assessment Scale-Cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog) and the AD Cooperative Study - instrumental Activities of Daily Living (ADCS-iADL). It demonstrates acceptable psychometric properties, and is effective in capturing both disease progression and separation of placebo and active drug effect. We assessed the performance of iADRS in the solanezumab EXPEDITION3 study, an 80-week, placebo-controlled study of individuals with mild AD dementia. A statistically significant difference between placebo and active drug was observed for iADRS score change from baseline at Week 28 (p=0.028) through Week 80 (p=0.015). Across the Phase 3 solanezumab trials, iADRS was the only tool that consistently differentiated between solanezumab and placebo groups. These findings suggest that the iADRS is a useful integrated measurement tool for treatment trials of individuals with mild AD dementia.

CITATION:
A.M. Wessels ; S.W. Andersen ; S.A. Dowsett ; E.R. Siemers (2018): The Integrated Alzheimer’s Disease Rating Scale (iADRS) Findings from the EXPEDITION3 Trial. The Journal of Prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease (JPAD). http://dx.doi.org/10.14283/jpad.2018.10

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ADHERENCE TO THE MEDITERRANEAN DIET IS NOT RELATED TO BETA-AMYLOID DEPOSITION: DATA FROM THE WOMEN’S HEALTHY AGEING PROJECT

E. Hill, C. Szoeke, L. Dennerstein, S. Campbell, P. Clifton

J Prev Alz Dis 2018;5(2):137-141

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Background: Research has indicated the neuroprotective potential of the Mediterranean diet. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet has shown preventative potential for Alzheimer’s disease incidence and prevalence, yet few studies have investigated the impact of Mediterranean diet adherence on the hallmark protein; beta-amyloid. Objectives: To investigate the association between Mediterranean diet adherence and beta-amyloid deposition in a cohort of healthy older Australian women. Design: This study was a cross-sectional investigation of participants from the longitudinal, epidemiologically sourced Women’s Healthy Ageing Project which is a follow-up of the Melbourne Women’s Midlife Health Project. Setting: Assessments were conducted at the Centre for Medical Research, Royal Melbourne Hospital in Melbourne, Australia. F-18 Florbetaben positron emission tomography scanning was conducted at the Austin Centre for PET in Victoria, Australia. Participants: One hundred and eleven Women’s Healthy Ageing Project participants were included in the study. Measurements: Mediterranean diet adherence scores for all participants were calculated from the administration of a validated food frequency questionnaire constructed by the Cancer Council of Victoria. Beta-amyloid deposition was measured using positron emission tomography standardised uptake value ratios. Results: Gamma regression analysis displayed no association between Mediterranean diet adherence and beta-amyloid deposition. This result was consistent across APOE-ε4 +/- cohorts and with the inclusion of covariates such as age, education, body mass index and cognition. Conclusions: This study found no association between adherence to the Mediterranean diet and beta-amyloid deposition in a cohort of healthy Australian women.

CITATION:
E. Hill ; C. Szoeke ; L. Dennerstein ; S. Campbell ; P. Clifton (2018): Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet Is not Related to Beta-Amyloid Deposition: Data from the Women’s Healthy Ageing Project. The Journal of Prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease (JPAD). http://dx.doi.org/10.14283/jpad.2018.12

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STRONG RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN MALNUTRITION AND COGNITIVE FRAILTY IN THE SINGAPORE LONGITUDINAL AGEING STUDIES (SLAS-1 AND SLAS-2)

L. Chye, K. Wei, M.S.Z. Nyunt, Q. Gao, S.L. Wee, T.P. Ng

J Prev Alz Dis 2018;5(2):142-148

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Background: Physical frailty is well known to be strongly associated with malnutrition, but the combined impact of physical frailty and cognitive impairment among non-demented older persons (cognitive frailty) on malnutrition prevalence is not well documented. Design: Cross-sectional cohort study. Setting and Participants: Community-dwelling older Singaporeans aged ≥55y (n=5414) without dementia in the Singapore Longitudinal Ageing Study (SLAS-1 and SLAS-2). Measurements: The Mini Nutritional Assessment – short form (MNA-SF) and Nutrition Screening Initiative (NSI) Determine Checklist were used to determine their nutritional status. Participants were categorized as cognitive normal (CN) or cognitive impaired (CI) by Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE<=23), as pre-frail (PF) (score=1-2) or frail (F) (score=3-5) using Fried’s criteria, and as cognitive pre-frail (PF+CI) or cognitive frail (F+CI). Results: The prevalence of cognitive frailty was 1.6%, and cognitive pre-frailty was 5.5% (total, 7.1%). The prevalence of MNA malnutrition was 2.4%, and NSI high nutritional risk was 6.3%. The prevalence of MNA malnutrition was lowest among Robust-CN and highest among Frail-CI (0.5% in Robust-CN, 0.6% in Robust-CI, 2.8% in Pre-frail-CN, 7.3% in Pre-frail-CI, 15.4% in Frail-CN, and 23.1% in Frail-CI). Similarly, the prevalence of NSI high nutritional risk was lowest in Robust-CN (3.7%) and highest in Frail-CI (13.6%). Adjusted for sociodemographic and health status, pre-frailty/frailty-CI versus Robust-CN was associated with the highest odds ratio of association with MNA malnutrition (OR=8.16, p<0.001), although not the highest with NSI high nutritional risk (OR=1.48, p=0.017). Conclusions: An extraordinary high prevalence of malnutrition was observed among older adults with cognitive frailty who should be specially targeted for active intervention.

CITATION:
L. Chye ; K. Wei ; M.S.Z. Nyunt ; Q. Gao ; S.L. Wee ; T.P. Ng (2017): Strong Relationship between Malnutrition and Cognitive Frailty in the Singapore Longitudinal Ageing Studies (SLAS-1 and SLAS-2). The Journal of Prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease (JPAD). http://dx.doi.org/10.14283/jpad.2017.46

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Review Articles

DEVELOPMENT OF AZELIRAGON, AN ORAL SMALL MOLECULE ANTAGONIST OF THE RECEPTOR FOR ADVANCED GLYCATION ENDPRODUCTS, FOR THE POTENTIAL SLOWING OF LOSS OF COGNITION IN MILD ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE

A.H. Burstein, M. Sabbagh, R. Andrews, C. Valcarce, I. Dunn, L. Altstiel

J Prev Alz Dis 2018;5(2):149-154

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Increasing evidence supports the role of the Receptor for Advanced Glycation Endproducts (RAGE) in the pathology of Alzheimer’s disease. Azeliragon (TTP488) is an orally bioavailable small molecule inhibitor of RAGE in Phase 3 development as a potential treatment to slow disease progression in patients mild AD. Preclinical studies in animal models of AD (tgAPPSwedish/London) have shown azeliragon to decrease Aβ plaque deposition; reduce total Aβ brain concentration while increasing plasma Aβ levels; decreases sAPPβ while increasing sAPPα; reduce levels of inflammatory cytokines; and slow cognitive decline and improve cerebral blood flow. In the Phase 2b study, 18-months treatment in patients with mild-to-moderate AD indicated a baseline to endpoint change in ADAS-cog of 3.1 points in favor of drug. A greater magnitude of effect was evident in the sub-group of patients with mild AD (MMSE 21-26) with a baseline to endpoint change of 4 points on the ADAS-cog in favor of azeliragon and a 1 point change in CDR-sb in favor of drug. Azeliragon 5 mg/day delayed time to cognitive deterioration (7-point change in ADAS-cog from baseline, logrank p=0.0149). Based on promising results from the Phase 2b study, a Phase 3 registration program (STEADFAST) is being conducted under a Special Protocol Assessment from FDA. The ongoing Phase 3 program, if successful may demonstrate azeliragon can slow cognitive decline in mild AD patients.

CITATION:
A.H. Burstein ; M. Sabbagh ; R. Andrews ; C. Valcarce ; I. Dunn ; L. Altstiel (2018): Development of Azeliragon, an Oral Small Molecule Antagonist of the Receptor for Advanced Glycation Endproducts, for the Potential Slowing of Loss of Cognition in Mild Alzheimer’s Disease. The Journal of Prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease (JPAD). http://dx.doi.org/10.14283/jpad.2018.18

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Letter to the Editor

NANOROBOTS THE FUTURE OF NEUROLOGY: A PERSPECTIVE ON ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE

C. Hooper, S. Layé

J Prev Alz Dis 2018;5(2):155-156

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CITATION:
C. Hooper ; S. Layé ; (2018): Nanorobots the Future of Neurology: A Perspective on Alzheimer’s Disease. The Journal of Prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease (JPAD). http://dx.doi.org/10.14283/jpad.2018.6

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